Develop secure Contracts with Gab Brand

Contracts and The Fine Print: Securing the What If’s of Freelancing

After some blunders with clients and having no paper work in place I found out the importance of Contracts and the Fine Print. I invested some time in developing solid contracts when seeking out clients for Gab Brand; here are some reasons why you should dive deeper into Contracts and the Fine Print.

Contracts Keep You Safe

Contracts and the annoyingly small print can be used to provide security for both client and supplier in the event of a dispute, late payment, or late work delivery.

Don't be afraid of the little details. The Fine Print in a contract could cost or save you a ton in the future!
Don’t be afraid of the little details. The Fine Print in a contract could cost or save you a ton in the future!

People can be caught poaching work from Freelance Writers. It is common for Clients to request articles from several writers using popular Writing Mills or Out Sourcing Platforms; they get loads of great material free to use because the writer had not said otherwise, in hopes of gaining employment.

Whether you are submitting a draft or pitching an article for consideration, you shouldn’t work under the implication of a verbal agreement. It doesn’t matter if it was delivered by e-mail, Skype Interviews, text, or by invitation using a popular Out Sourcing Platform.

It can be seen as over-cautious, but create a contract for draft submissions and add footnotes to protect any work submitted before actual employment, unless you are willingly giving out free work as a hiring incentive.

Contracts Keep Freelancers on Track

Contracts can be used to keep track of your work. Adding features such as draft confirmations or signatures upon delivery, you can include important details regarding scheduling, payments and even content structure, and use of keywords.

Use attachments with your contracts and include in the fine print any pre-set schedule, the cost of additional work, and invoices to keep track of work submitted, drafts included, the number of revisions needed, and more.

You can make use of Contracts when charging per word [in addition to keyword placement and content structure] and add overages/additional invoice procedure into the fine print area. Some writers charge more for extra back links, imagery, and use of digital files in submissions.

Resources to Develop your Freelance Contract

Developing your Freelance contract and fine tuning the small print, you want to cover the basics and also include all those What If Moments. It is important to gather resources that will help you create a solid contract for Freelance work.

Freelance Writers is already a risky business; protect yourself and your work by investing time in a multi-functional contract for the various service you might want to provide as Freelance/Contracted work-for-hire.
Freelance Writing is already a risky business; protect yourself and your work by investing time in a multi-functional contract for the various service you might want to provide as Freelance/Contracted work-for-hire.

You don’t want to be held liable for what a client does with your work; you can’t have them skating off with it for free; What if they decided they don’t want to pay but have published it anyway? Here are some resources to help you create a basic and multi-functional contract for Freelance Work:

  • While I usually discourage Wiki-Anything, it’s credibility has improved since editing guidelines have become more restrictive, This simple guideline from WikiHow is a good example of what sort of template to use when developing a general contract for freelance work.
  • Maybe you are not a freelance writer? No problem, there are freelance designer templates and other essential contracts for potential freelance work for easy use if you run a google search on your niche topic, project type and length, and any extra features such as milestones, inventory reimbursements, etc.
  • Docracy also offers a Work-for-hire- Freelance writing contract to be used for an independent contractor relationship; this sample is especially useful for those freelancers who are approached by other freelancers to supplement work they already have.

Gab Brand Wants To Hear From You

What is your biggest hassle when it comes to creating a contract between you and your client? Have you had to outsource work before and had your contract fall through? What Loop Holes would you warn other Freelancers to look out for when building a solid contract?

Share all your thoughts with us on your favorite Social Networks and be sure to use the hashtag #GabBrand and let us know how you improved your contract!

XOXO-

Gab Brand

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